How To Make Your Own Springs For Extruded Rail T-Nuts

Open-Source Extruded Profile systems are a mature breed these days. With Openbuilds, Makerslide, and Openbeam, we’ve got plenty of systems to choose from; and Amazon and Alibaba are coming in strong with lots of generic interchangeable parts. These open-source framing systems have borrowed tricks from some decades-old industry players like Rexroth and 80/20. But from all they’ve gleaned, there’s still one trick they haven’t snagged yet: affordable springloaded T-nuts. I’ve discussed a few tricks when working with these systems before, and Roger Cheng came up with a 3D printed technique for working with T-nuts. But today I’ll take another step and show you how to make our own springs for VSlot rail nuts. For anyone playing extrusion hot-potato in a multi-person build a-la Lasersaur, springloaded T-Nuts are a wonderful convenience. When springloaded, these otherwise normal T-nuts stick in place rather than slide down the slot, making the building process more manageable with less parts to track simultaneously. We just set and forget! Don’t get me wrong. Springloaded T-nuts already exist for us hobbyists using maker-style extrusions. But they’re pricey, as in more-than-a-dollar-a-p...

Mitsubishi Materials unveils new six-flute conical taper barrel end mills

VQ, the latest series of end mills from Mitsubishi Materials has been further expanded to include an innovative new six-flute, conical taper barrel type. This latest addition has been specially designed for high efficiency finish machining of titanium alloy blades and for milling other materials from mild steel through to aluminium alloys. The ability to outperform standard ball nose end mills is provided by the large conical taper barrel form that blends seamlessly with the nose radius. This larger tangential radius permits a much greater overlap and therefore greatly reduces the number of passes required to cover the surface area of the material being machined. The larger overlap also leads to significant improvements in the surface finish. Additionally, the six-flute geometry permits greater feeds and promotes further savings in machining time. When compared to ball nose end mills, the conical taper form with the much larger area of contact with the workpiece during barrel milling could lead to chatter and vibration, but this concern is negated by the irregular pitch geometry of the flutes. The radial accuracy of ±0.01mm for the end (RE1) and barrel radii (RE2) are also key f...