SHEPHERDSTOWN — Shade your eyes. Crane your neck and look up high into a tree at

SHEPHERDSTOWN — Shade your eyes. Crane your neck and look up high into a tree at a very large bird nest constructed of sticks, branches and pieces of wood. You can’t see the inside of the nest, but it is lined with softer materials such as moss or tree leaves. At the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services National Conservation Training Center, just outside Shepherdstown, are bald eagles. At the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services National Conservation Training Center, just outside Shepherdstown, are bald eagles. Courtesy photo They are not raising young at this time of the year. But they usually stay around the area because of the Potomac River and its revived waters now providing the large birds with fish and even mammals that live near it. In many years, the adult eagles lay two or three eggs and brood them for about 35 days before they hatch. In recent years, the eggs have hatched during the cold of February. And snows and cold temperatures worsened by steady winds have killed the young eaglets. If the young do survive the cold and damp weather, they will attempt their first flights in 10 to 12 weeks. Many times, if eggs hatch at three or four day intervals, only the larges...

CAMBRIDGE — When he was young, Willie Cole repaired steam irons for his grandmother and great-grandmother,

CAMBRIDGE — When he was young, Willie Cole repaired steam irons for his grandmother and great-grandmother, who were housekeepers. He honors them, and the backbreaking labor of legions of other women, in “Beauties,” his luminous show at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Cole cracks open the symbolic and metaphoric power of everyday objects. Here, he chooses the ironing board, an image he has used before; in “Stowage,” a 1997 woodblock print nearly 8 feet long, the shape of an ironing board stood in for a schematic of a slave ship. The artist, with master printer Cole Rogers and his team at Highpoint Editions in Minneapolis, tracked down and flattened more than 20 old ironing boards. They pounded them with hammers and bricks, drove cars over them, and ran them through a printing press to get them down to 3/16-inches thick before they inked them. The resulting intaglio prints are mounted upright, side by side, each with a name at the bottom taken from women of Cole’s grandmothers’ generations: Bertha Mae, Calpurnia. The names are relief prints, a gentler process than intaglio, called kiss impressions. A tender gesture after all the rough treatment. The horizontal “Stowag...