New mobility faces a veritable laundry list of challenges, from regulatory obstacles to a lack of interoperability, to vested interests opposing the changes that progress requires. There is nothing unusual about this, however. All technologies, especially deeply transformational ones, face these hurdles.  Smart cities are, of course, leading the charge for new mobility. The concept factors heavily in their plans across the board, in pretty much every jurisdiction that is seriously working towards a new kind of urban transportation model. Per Deloitte Insights: “Various elements of such ‘smart cities’ will work in harmony to deliver a higher standard of living for residents by helping tackle issues such as congestion, pollution, public safety, and access to city services. These connected and smart urban ecosystems will be equipped with a wide variety of applications, each unique and with different purposes. As a result, citizens could see marked improvements in their standard of living, the environment, and the safety and security of, among other things, neighborhoods, workplaces, and airports.” Although these changes herald a profoundly positive future for urban dwellers, obtain...