The delivery people who hustle for Uber Eats, Foodora and DoorDash have traded job stability for the flexibility of the gig economy. Every day, they risk their lives to deliver your Libretto pizza or Flock salad. They’re the workforce of the future When Iván Ostos started as a Foodora bike courier in 2016, he planned to work for the company for just a few months. He was studying music at Humber and thought it would be a fun summer job. And it was—flexible schedule, low stress, low commitment. He had no real boss. He got to work outside. The money wasn’t too bad, either; most shifts, he made about $18 an hour, almost seven dollars more than the minimum wage at the time. But three months became six months, then six months became a year. He dropped out of Humber and became a full-time Foodster, the company’s term for its couriers. The job became less fun. Food delivery apps, which were a relative novelty when Ostos first started, were suddenly wildly popular. Other companies had moved in or aggressively expanded—Uber Eats, SkipTheDishes, DoorDash—and couriers swarmed the streets. Ostos’ wages took a nosedive. He started a second delivery gig, with Uber Eats, and sandwiched those sh...